Call 9329 7077 Book Online Here 

Vertigo Dizziness

The Epley Maneuver and Osteopathy


Vertigo is an an unbearable condition that can literally leave the sufferer house-bound and nauseous for weeks on end. Thankfully researchers have discovered a simple routine your Osteopath can perform that can immediately provide relief for the most common cause of vertigo, Posterior Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. 

In a standard consultation, Osteopath Dr Paul O’Keefe will move you through a simple set of body positions to determine the likelihood of achieving full relief from vertigo using The Epley Maneuver. 

The Epley Maneuver is a relatively simple set of movements that Paul will take you through in a matter of under 10 minutes. Most patients feel significant relief immediately, with a small number requiring a follow-up session a few days later. 

Once symptoms have been resolved, it may be beneficial to perform the procedure once every 2-3 years (if necessary) however many people never experience vertigo again.

Paul is available on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Fridays.

Osteopathy fees:
Initial Consultation (45-50 mins) $110 
Standard Consultation (30 mins) $85 
Long Consultation (60 mins) $140
Private health insurance rebates are available (HICAPS)

Don't suffer any longer, book yourself in now!



The Science Behind Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

From:

An Abbreviated Diagnostic Maneuver for Posterior Benign Positional Paroxysmal Vertigo – Pia Michael, Carolina Estibaliz Oliva, Marcia Nuñez, Cristian Barraza, Juan Pablo Faúndez, and Hayo A. Breinbauer. Front Neurol. 2016; 7: 115.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo represents a common clinical entity that is encountered not only by specialists in neuro-otology and balance disorders but also by non-specialized otolaryngologists, neurologists, or geriatricians and general practitioners in primary care or emergency departments, among many other settings, in routine clinical practice (10–12). It is widely accepted that BPPV is caused by the dislodgement of otoconia from the otolith macula (8, 12). These particles then float until they become trapped within a semicircular canal (canalolithiasis) or attached to its cupula (cupulolithiasis). Then, after a change in head position in the plane of the affected canal, gravity induces the trapped otoconia to move, resulting in abnormal endolymph flow and the subsequent deflection of the cupula in cases of canalolithiasis or direct cupular deflection in cases of cupulolithiasis. In both scenarios, the vestibular afferents from the affected canal are modulated (stimulated or inhibited) in an abnormal and augmented fashion, particularly in comparison to the “paired canal” in the contralateral ear, which lacks the “extra weight” of the dislodged otoconia required to react normally to head movements. The computation of this asymmetry at the vestibular nuclei triggers not only vertigo or dizziness but also a specific type of nystagmus that depends on the canal that is affected by the disease. All three semicircular canals can be afflicted by this condition (11–13).